My Poor, Ugly, Beautiful Daughter

$45.00
Availability: In stock
Delivery time: This item will be made to order and will be shipped out at the end of the show January 31, 2021. Please let us know if you wish to have it earlier and we will do our best to make accommodations!

My Poor, Ugly, Beautiful Daughter

2019

12" x 18"

Professional Inkjet Print

*Orders will ship out at the end of the show in January. Please reach out to us if you would like your order sooner and we will do our best to make accommodations!

About The Show:

My exploration of cosplay, through the creation of fandom-based hoods and masks, questions the division between high and low art. Traditionally, fine arts has shunned fan-based art like cosplay. By creating ma

My exploration of cosplay, through the creation of fandom-based hoods and masks, questions the division between high and low art. Traditionally, fine arts has shunned fan-based art like cosplay. By creating masks that are based on fandoms and then photographing them using traditional portraiture methods, my intent is to position cosplay within the fine arts. My photographs have the unique ability to be shown in galleries, art museums, and the Comic-Con convention space. Fine art spaces like galleries and museums appreciate craft, photography, and intent while cosplayers and other fans understand the popular culture references and transformations the masks have undergone. By bringing these two different audiences together on equal terms, I give them the opportunity to better understand one another.

Along with exploring the divide between art and fandom, my hoods and masks also explore identity in cosplay. Cosplay allows the wearer to transform themselves into someone else, usually a character from popular culture. However, the identity of the cosplayer is never completely overcome by the identity of the character they are cosplaying. Instead of hiding my identity, I amplify it through material, photography strategies, and the transformation of the costume.

sks that are based on fandoms and then photographing them using traditional portraiture methods, my intent is to position cosplay within the fine arts. My photographs have the unique ability to be shown in galleries, art museums, and the Comic-Con convention space. Fine art spaces like galleries and museums appreciate craft, photography, and intent while cosplayers and other fans understand the popular culture references and transformations the masks have undergone. By bringing these two different audiences together on equal terms, I give them the opportunity to better understand one another.

Along with exploring the divide between art and fandom, my hoods and masks also explore identity in cosplay. Cosplay allows the wearer to transform themselves into someone else, usually a character from popular culture. However, the identity of the cosplayer is never completely overcome by the identity of the character they are cosplaying. Instead of hiding my identity, I amplify it through material, photography strategies, and the transformation of the costume.

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